Three Companies Probably Not Celebrating Father's Day

Father’s Day is this weekend and, as such, PRs and marketing staff have been tasked with creating as tenuous a link as possible to the festivities, in the hope that last minute shoppers be brainwashed into thinking that a heavy duty autolock tape measure is the perfect way to show your dad how much you love and appreciate him.

There are some companies, though, who have gone out of their way to hack off dads during the year and who should probably stay well away from this particular bandwagon. They are steadfastly refusing to accept that the role of the dad has changed and some of us, you know, actually enjoy spending time with our families. Here are three of them who just don’t get it:

1) Amazon US

amazon mom
Image by Chris Routly

The American branch of the bookshop-destroyer has seen fit to ignore the REST OF THE WORLD, and still insists on calling its family discount scheme Amazon Mom, rather than Amazon Family LIKE EVERYWHERE ELSE! There is an Amazon Mom petition though, with nearly 13,000 supporters at the last count who are urging them to change and perhaps take a step into the 21st century where we are all responsible for our offspring. Come in, Amazon US, the water is lovely!

2) Asda

Asda mums

This was brought to my attention by Dad Who Blogs, who had become frustrated by a trip to a supermarket (haven’t we all?). However, his beef was the range of food that is apparently “chosen by kids, approved by mums”. Great that the mums approved, but did the dads have a say too? Is mum’s approval rated as more important than dad’s? Would it really be so difficult to change it to “approved by parents”? Speaking of which…

3) Heinz

Heinz

A mum just like me? How much like me? Not too much like me, I hope! I wrote an open letter to Heinz because of this slogan emblazoned on the side of their food jar. The assumption by the brand is that only mums feed their children. I have a full washing basket of clothes worn only once before being spattered in food to prove otherwise.

The letter received a fair amount of press, with people commenting on the BT news site that I should do something more worthwhile with my time. I repeat, these were people commenting on articles on the BT news site, telling me that I should do something worthwhile with my time. Irony died that day.

Do you have any other examples of everyday sexism like this? Stick them in the comments.

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